What Was The Significance Of The Munich Agreement

Later, at the meeting, a deception was agreed in advance to influence and pressure Chamberlain: one of Hitler`s accomplices entered the room to inform Hitler of other Germans killed in Czechoslovakia, and Hitler then shouted: “I will avenge each of them. The Czechs must be destroyed. [32] The meeting ended with Hitler`s refusal to make concessions to the demands of the Allies. [32] Later that evening, Hitler was concerned that he had gone too far to put pressure on Chamberlain, and he called Chamberlain`s hotel suite to say that he would only accept the annexation of Sudetenland without plans in other areas, provided that Czechoslovakia began evacuating ethnic Chechens from the majority regions of Germany by 8 p.m. on September 26. After being pushed by Chamberlain, Hitler agreed to issue the ultimatum for October 1 (the same date on which Operation Green was to begin). [37] Hitler then told Chamberlain that it was a concession he wanted to make to the Prime Minister as a “gift”, out of respect for the fact that Chamberlain was prepared to back down a little from his previous position. [37] Hitler added that after the annexation of the Sudetenland, Germany would no longer have territorial rights over Czechoslovakia and would enter into a collective agreement to guarantee the borders of Germany and Czechoslovakia. [37] London, FridayThe Munich Agreement gives Hitler everything he wants (first), except to the extent that it may not be entirely possible to get it as quickly as he would have done under Godesberg`s full ultimatum. He will begin tomorrow the invasion of Czechoslovakia, as he threatened in his speech of 12 September. It is free to occupy all the regions where the Sudeten Germans are the majority, and this by leaps and bounds.

The economic consequences of the Munich agreement will certainly be very severe for Czechoslovakia. The loss of industries, railwayheads, knots, etc., cannot help but cause a sharp loss of trade and unemployment. There is no doubt that Czechoslovakia becomes the object of quasi-colonial exploitation for Germany. The slogan “Above us, without us!” (Czech: O n`s bez n`s!) sums up the feelings of the Czechoslovakian population (Slovakia and the Czech Republic) towards the agreement. [Citation required] On its way to Germany, Czechoslovakia (as the state was renamed) lost its reasonable border with Germany and its fortifications.